Presenter Information

Val Shute, Florida State University

Start Date

18-8-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2015 10:15 AM

Subjects

Physics, Science teaching, Secondary education, Computer games, Computer simulation, Evaluation methods, Teaching innovations, Instructional development, Digital technology, Student assessment

Abstract

Games can be powerful vehicles to support learning, but their success in education hinges on getting the assessment part right. In this presentation, I will explore how games can use stealth assessment to measure and support the learning of competencies critical for the future. I will discuss what stealth assessment is, why it is important, and how to develop and accomplish it. I will also provide examples within the context of a game called Physics Playground that I designed and developed with my team. I’ll share what has been learned by recent research on stealth assessments in games, including: Does stealth assessment provide valid and reliable estimates of students’ developing competencies, including qualitative understanding of physics, persistence, and creativity? Can students actually learn anything as a function of gameplay? Are games designed with stealth assessment capabilities still fun?

Place of Publication

Melbourne

Publisher

Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

ISBN

9781742862873

Geographic Subject

United States

 
Aug 18th, 9:00 AM Aug 18th, 10:15 AM

Stealth assessment in video games

Games can be powerful vehicles to support learning, but their success in education hinges on getting the assessment part right. In this presentation, I will explore how games can use stealth assessment to measure and support the learning of competencies critical for the future. I will discuss what stealth assessment is, why it is important, and how to develop and accomplish it. I will also provide examples within the context of a game called Physics Playground that I designed and developed with my team. I’ll share what has been learned by recent research on stealth assessments in games, including: Does stealth assessment provide valid and reliable estimates of students’ developing competencies, including qualitative understanding of physics, persistence, and creativity? Can students actually learn anything as a function of gameplay? Are games designed with stealth assessment capabilities still fun?