Location

Great Hall 2

Start Date

8-8-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

8-8-2016 4:00 PM

Subjects

Mathematics achievement, Mathematics tests, Numeracy, Mathematical thinking, Mathematics skills, Adults, Secondary school students, International programs, Lifelong learning, Surveys

Comments

Concurrent session Block 2

Abstract

This presentation will look at some key messages from the Australian results of both the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). PISA assesses the mathematical literacy of 15-year-old students around Australia, whilst PIAAC assesses the numeracy proficiency of adults aged 15–74. What do the two surveys assess and are they telling a similar story? How solid are Australia’s mathematical foundations and what do they say about teaching and learning? How do Australia’s results compare internationally with those leading the field? What are some of the research outcomes and implications for both policy and practice for schools and lifelong learning, including about linking maths and life outside the classroom? This paper presents a perspective on the mathematical capabilities of Australian students as revealed through data from the two international assessment programs.

Place of Publication

Melbourne Vic

Publisher

Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

ISBN

9781742864075

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Aug 8th, 2:45 PM Aug 8th, 4:00 PM

Session F : Are Australian mathematical foundations solid enough for the 21st century?

Great Hall 2

This presentation will look at some key messages from the Australian results of both the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). PISA assesses the mathematical literacy of 15-year-old students around Australia, whilst PIAAC assesses the numeracy proficiency of adults aged 15–74. What do the two surveys assess and are they telling a similar story? How solid are Australia’s mathematical foundations and what do they say about teaching and learning? How do Australia’s results compare internationally with those leading the field? What are some of the research outcomes and implications for both policy and practice for schools and lifelong learning, including about linking maths and life outside the classroom? This paper presents a perspective on the mathematical capabilities of Australian students as revealed through data from the two international assessment programs.