Location

Great Hall 2

Start Date

8-8-2016 9:30 AM

End Date

8-8-2016 10:45 AM

Subjects

STEM education, Educational policy, Policy development, Science careers, Science achievement, Mathematics achievement, Subject selection (Students), Professional development, Mathematics teachers, Science teachers

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Keynote 1

Abstract

There is a common issue across Europe and the UK that vexes governments, employers and educationalists: the need for more young people to choose to study STEM subjects, become graduates in STEM subjects and then take up STEM careers. In addition, there is an urgent need for more STEM skills in the total workforce. For decades, the UK government has been committed to addressing this issue with a range of activities and strategies. Since the influential UK Government report conducted by Sir Gareth Roberts (2002), there have been policy and funding commitments by the various UK governments to improve outcomes for young people. These commitments have included incentives for people with industry experience and for graduates with good degrees to enter teaching; adopting accountability measures for schools to improve outcomes for young people, including better progression to STEM subjects at student milestones of 16 and 19 years of age; developing the STEM curriculum, including bringing a more cohesive approach to the vast array of curriculum enrichment by industry, charities and government; using national strategies for school improvement; and providing national continuing professional development for teachers and support staff, particularly through the National STEM Learning Centre and Network. This presentation will consider the evidence of the impact of the various strategies and the implications for other jurisdictions.

Place of Publication

Melbourne Vic

Publisher

Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

ISBN

9781742864075

Geographic Subject

United Kingdom

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Aug 8th, 9:30 AM Aug 8th, 10:45 AM

Must try harder : An evaluation of the UK government’s policy directions in STEM education

Great Hall 2

There is a common issue across Europe and the UK that vexes governments, employers and educationalists: the need for more young people to choose to study STEM subjects, become graduates in STEM subjects and then take up STEM careers. In addition, there is an urgent need for more STEM skills in the total workforce. For decades, the UK government has been committed to addressing this issue with a range of activities and strategies. Since the influential UK Government report conducted by Sir Gareth Roberts (2002), there have been policy and funding commitments by the various UK governments to improve outcomes for young people. These commitments have included incentives for people with industry experience and for graduates with good degrees to enter teaching; adopting accountability measures for schools to improve outcomes for young people, including better progression to STEM subjects at student milestones of 16 and 19 years of age; developing the STEM curriculum, including bringing a more cohesive approach to the vast array of curriculum enrichment by industry, charities and government; using national strategies for school improvement; and providing national continuing professional development for teachers and support staff, particularly through the National STEM Learning Centre and Network. This presentation will consider the evidence of the impact of the various strategies and the implications for other jurisdictions.