Monday 5 August 2019

Start Date

5-8-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

5-8-2019 4:00 PM

Subjects

Teacher improvement, Teacher effectiveness, Learning communities, Teacher evaluation, Lesson observation criteria, Primary secondary education

Abstract

Quality Teaching Rounds (QTR) was first conceptualised by Julie Bowe and Jenny Gore in 2007. It involves teachers working in professional learning communities (PLCs) to reflect on their classroom practice through the lens of the quality teaching model. This teacher-led process builds capacity for quality teaching with novice and experienced teachers alike. Following a set of protocols and adhering to essential features of the approach, one PLC member teaches a lesson, observed by all others. The lesson is coded individually and then collaboratively analysed, using the shared language of the model. This poster presentation graphically highlights evidence from several research studies conducted by the University of Newcastle over the past 15 years. The strong body of evidence demonstrates that QTR has positive effects because, not despite, the fact that it brings teachers together across stages and subjects.

Place of Publication

Melbourne, Australia

Publisher

Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

ISBN

9781742865546

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Aug 5th, 3:30 PM Aug 5th, 4:00 PM

Building the capacity of teachers for supporting 21st-century learning

Quality Teaching Rounds (QTR) was first conceptualised by Julie Bowe and Jenny Gore in 2007. It involves teachers working in professional learning communities (PLCs) to reflect on their classroom practice through the lens of the quality teaching model. This teacher-led process builds capacity for quality teaching with novice and experienced teachers alike. Following a set of protocols and adhering to essential features of the approach, one PLC member teaches a lesson, observed by all others. The lesson is coded individually and then collaboratively analysed, using the shared language of the model. This poster presentation graphically highlights evidence from several research studies conducted by the University of Newcastle over the past 15 years. The strong body of evidence demonstrates that QTR has positive effects because, not despite, the fact that it brings teachers together across stages and subjects.