Monday 5 August 2019

Start Date

5-8-2019 11:30 AM

End Date

5-8-2019 12:30 PM

Subjects

Interpersonal competence, Generic skills, Social behaviour, Emotional response, Emotional intelligence, Parent child relationship, Bullying, International studies, Primary secondary education

Abstract

In an increasingly fast-changing and diverse world, the importance of developing social and emotional skills is becoming more evident. The large body of accumulated evidence shows that these skills have strong relationships with life outcomes and they have been referred to as a key component of 21st century skills. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Study on Social and Emotional Skills is a new international assessment of these skills in students at primary and secondary schools. This study also gathers information on students’ families, schools and community learning contexts, aiming to provide information about the conditions or practices that foster or hinder the development of these critical skills. This paper will examine the development of the study – based on the ‘Big Five’ model of personality characteristics – and describe developments so far.

RC2019_THOMSON_Powerpoint.pdf (1340 kB)
OECD Study on Social and Emotional Skills presentation

Place of Publication

Melbourne, Australia

Publisher

Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

ISBN

9781742865546

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Aug 5th, 11:30 AM Aug 5th, 12:30 PM

Assessing and understanding social and emotional skills: The OECD Study on Social and Emotional Skills

In an increasingly fast-changing and diverse world, the importance of developing social and emotional skills is becoming more evident. The large body of accumulated evidence shows that these skills have strong relationships with life outcomes and they have been referred to as a key component of 21st century skills. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Study on Social and Emotional Skills is a new international assessment of these skills in students at primary and secondary schools. This study also gathers information on students’ families, schools and community learning contexts, aiming to provide information about the conditions or practices that foster or hinder the development of these critical skills. This paper will examine the development of the study – based on the ‘Big Five’ model of personality characteristics – and describe developments so far.