Monday 5 August 2019

Start Date

5-8-2019 1:15 PM

End Date

5-8-2019 2:15 PM

Subjects

Generic skills, Cooperation, Futures (Of society), Problem solving, Critical thinking, Creativity, Curriculum frameworks, Inquiry, Measurement, Educational policy, Primary secondary education

Abstract

It is vital that education systems deliver quality outcomes for all young people and prepare them well for their future in the economy and society. To do so, many systems have traditionally had a strong focus on developing academic skills, particularly in literacy and numeracy. In recent years, education systems have developed greater expectations that schools will also equip young people with a broader set of skills for the 21st century (e.g. creativity, critical thinking, problem-solving). This paper addresses these developments and the challenges they present. Building on an evidence-based review, this paper asks what are the key skills required for the 21st century? How do various jurisdictions articulate their aspirations concerning these broader skills within their curricular and policy frameworks? What evidence is there about the best way to incorporate key skills for the 21st century into curriculum and teaching and learning? How can a more diverse set of skills be measured and assessed?

Place of Publication

Melbourne, Australia

Publisher

Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

ISBN

9781742865546

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Aug 5th, 1:15 PM Aug 5th, 2:15 PM

Key skills for the 21st century: An evidence-based review

It is vital that education systems deliver quality outcomes for all young people and prepare them well for their future in the economy and society. To do so, many systems have traditionally had a strong focus on developing academic skills, particularly in literacy and numeracy. In recent years, education systems have developed greater expectations that schools will also equip young people with a broader set of skills for the 21st century (e.g. creativity, critical thinking, problem-solving). This paper addresses these developments and the challenges they present. Building on an evidence-based review, this paper asks what are the key skills required for the 21st century? How do various jurisdictions articulate their aspirations concerning these broader skills within their curricular and policy frameworks? What evidence is there about the best way to incorporate key skills for the 21st century into curriculum and teaching and learning? How can a more diverse set of skills be measured and assessed?